PLACE OF ARTICULATION

PLACE OF ARTICULATION
GLOTTAL
The glottis is even deeper than the pharynx and
epiglottis in the throat. You can see where
glottal consonants are produced here EXAMPLE;
happy, heat
PHARYNGEAL AND EPIGLOTTAL
We now proceed even deeper in the vocal tract
and reach a point where only the root of the
tongue reaches, at least in normal cases.
UVULAR
A little deeper in the mouth, the uvula is found
(the little thing that's dangling from the top in
the back of the mouth), which is used for uvular
consonants
VELAR
There are a few velars in English, so it should be
pretty straightforward to learn what their point
of articulation is EXAMPLE: king
PALATAL
We are now getting to a depth in the mouth
where portions like the back of the tongue are
starting to be used to produce sounds
Example; YET
ALVEOLO-PALATAL
This is where it gets trickier because it's
becoming more and more difficult to feel areas
in your mouth that are that deep and also
because alveolo-palatals are not present in
Standard American English
PALATO-ALVEOLAR
Palato-alveolars occur slightly deeper in the
mouth than alveolars. EXAMPLE: sheep
ALVEOLAR
The point of articulation of alveolar consonants
is situated near the alveolar ridge which is the
area lying between the upper front teeth and
the palate. EXAMPLE: tow and sap
DENTAL
Some languages have dental consonants where
only the tongue and the teeth are used.[θ] and
[ð]. EXAMPLE: thisthese
LINGUOLABIAL
Linguolabials are articulated by using both the
tongue and the upper lip. EXAMPLE; [θ]
VOICELESS; thing, with and [ð].VOICED; that,
smooth
LABIODENTAL
Labiodentals are also pretty straightforward;
they are articulated by using both the lower lip
and the upper front teeth. EXAMPLE: /f/
voiceless; food, thief. /v/; above, waiver
BILABIAL
Bilabials are consonant sounds produced by
using both lips together. EXAMPLE: /p/
voiceless; pot, happy. /b/ voiced; ball, rub.
/m/ nasal; mask, calm. /w/ glide; wish
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